Suspected Drug Overdose at Rave Prompts Investigation

Posted By Los Angeles Criminal Defense Attorney || 16-Jul-2010

A 15 year old girl died last weekend at the Electric Daisy Festival, a two-day music festival and rave at the LA Memorial Coliseum. Sasha Rodriguez, the victim, was apparently on ecstasy, an illegal drug that is popular at raves. According to her friends, Rodriguez passed out and was rushed to the hospital where she fell into a coma. She suffered from respiratory arrest and multiple organ failure. She was removed from life support by her family on Tuesday.

Ectasy can cause strokes, seizures, and kidney failure. Ecstasy overdoses often involve dehydration or overhydration.

Around 185,000 people attended the Los Angeles festival, which was supposed to be a 16-and-older event. Attendees of the rave have reported that no IDs were checked, and that there were many young teenagers present. An investigation is pending and the Coliseum has put a moratorium on rave events.

During the festival, there were over 200 requests for medical attention; 114 people were hospitalized. In addition to drug abuse and overdoses, many people were injured by the crowd. There were 250 police present, and 118 people were arrested, the majority for drug offenses.

If you have been arrested for a drug crime, contact a Los Angeles Criminal Defense Lawyer.
Categories: Drug Abuse, Drug Offenses

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